Saturday, 17 November 2012

Sportsman of the Year - Winners and Finalists

Sportsman of the Year























John Hopley Memorial Trophy - Winners and Finalists

Rhodesia

1956 at SALISBURY

Winner: Margot Boileau (hockey). 
Other finalists: Don Black (tennis), David Lewis (cricket), Percy Mansell (cricket), Gerry Poval (billiards).

1957 at KITWE
Winner: Hilton Morgan (bisley). 
Other finalists: Jimmy de Villiers (motor racing), Basil Katz (tennis), Natalie Steward (swimming), Tony Pithey (cricket).
See : http://rhodesiansportprofiles.blogspot.com/2012/01/fred-hilton-morgan.html 

1958 at BULAWAYO
Winner Terry Sullivan (athletics). 
Other finalists: Dave Procter (golf), Lloyd Koch (hockey and cricket), Jimmy de Villiers (motor racing), Eric Cary (squash, hockey and badminton).
Visit: http://rhodesiansportprofiles.blogspot.com/2012/06/terence-allman-sullivan.html 

1959 at SALISBURY
Winner: Gary Hocking (motor cycling).
Other finalists: Flo Kennedy (badminton), Des van Jaarsveldt (rugby), Harold Paton (cricket and soccer). Dennis Pearson (channel swimming).
Visit: http://rhodesiansportprofiles.blogspot.com/2012/07/gary-hocking.html 

1960 at SALISBURY
Winner: Terry Sullivan (athletics). 
Other finalists: Des van Jaarsveldt (rugby), David Butler (yachting), Abe Bekker (boxing), Margaret Harriman (archery).
Visit: http://rhodesiansportprofiles.blogspot.com/2012/06/terence-allman-sullivan.html 

1961 at SALISBURY
Winner Ronnie Hill (rugby). 
Other finalists: David Lewis (cricket), Hilton Morgan (hockey), Shelagh Nefdt (hockey), Joe Sanderson (hockey).
Visit: http://rhodesiansportprofiles.blogspot.com/2012/05/ed.html 

1962 at SALISBURY
Winner Godfrey Lawrence (cricket). 
Other finalists: Jim Redman (motor cycling), Danie Burger (athletics), Gary Hocking (motor cycling), John Love (motor racing).
Visit: http://rhodesiansportprofiles.blogspot.com/2012/05/ed.html 

1963 at SALISBURY 
Winner Adrian Bey (tennis). 
Other finalists: JimRedman (motor cycling), Danie Burger (athletics), Joe Partridge (cricket), Marilyn Sidelsky (swimming).
Visit: http://rhodesiansportprofiles.blogspot.com/2012/09/adrian-bey.html 

1964 at SALISBURY 
Winner: Jim Redman (motor cycling). 
Other finalists: John Love (motor racing), Joe Partridge (cricket), Colin Bland (cricket), Lynn Gilchrist (paraplegics).
Visit: http://rhodesiansportprofiles.blogspot.com/2012/09/james-albert-redman.html 

1965 at SALISBURY
Winner Colin Bland (cricket). 
Other finalists: Neil Jardine (rugby), Tony Pithey (cricket), Alex Cracknell (shooting), Enid Spence (hockey).
Visit: http://rhodesiansportprofiles.blogspot.com/2012/03/kenneth-colin-bland.html 

1966 at SALISBURY
Winner Ian Bond (rugby). 
Other finalists: Enid Spence (hockey), Colin Bland (cricket), John Love (motor racing), Terry Rossiter (diving). Rob Ullyett (cricket and hockey).

1967 at SALISBURY
Winner Jack du Preez (cricket). 
Other finalists: Gay Erskine (squash), John Keyter (swimming), John Love (motor racing), Pat Walkden (tennis), Bob White (golf).
Visit: http://rhodesiansportprofiles.blogspot.com/2012/08/john-harcourt-jackie-du-preez.html 

1968 at BULAWAYO
Winner: John Love (motor racing). 
Other finalists: Gay Erskine (squash), Angela Edwards (show jumping), Anthea Stewart (hockey), Larry Farren (boxing).
Visit: http://rhodesiansportprofiles.blogspot.com/2012/09/john-maxwell-love.html 

1969 at SALISBURY
Winner: John Keyter (swimming). 
Other finalists: Rob Mundell (rugby), Yvonne Robinson (hockey), Tienie Martin (rugby), Russell McKinley (baseball).
Visit: http://rhodesiansportprofiles.blogspot.com/2012/10/john-keyter.html 

1970 at SALISBURY
Winner Artwell Mandaza (athletics). 
Other finalists: Hank Irvine (tennis), Rob Jordan (soccer), John McPhun (cricket and hockey), Rob Mundell (rugby).
Visit: http://rhodesiansportprofiles.blogspot.com/2012/11/artwell-mandaza.html 

1971 at SALISBURY
Winner: Mike Procter (cricket). 
Other finalists: Don Liebermann (diving), Steve Sherren (squash), Simon Hobday (golf), Terry Bowes (cricket and rugby).
Visit: http://rhodesiansportprofiles.blogspot.com/2012/10/michael-john-proctor.html 

1972 at BULAWAYO
Winner Mike Procter (cricket). 
Other finalists: Andrew Pattison (tennis), Sandra James (paraplegics), Thelma Ault (bowls), Bob Hatherly (swimming).
Visit: http://rhodesiansportprofiles.blogspot.com/2012/10/michael-john-proctor.html 

1973 at SALISBURY
Winner Gay Erskine (squash).
Other finalists: George Harvey (golf), Ian Robertson (rugby), Steve Sherren (squash), Allan Peake
(hockey).
Visit: http://rhodesiansportprofiles.blogspot.com/2012/08/gay-alison-erskine.html 

1974 at SALISBURY
Winner: Dave West (hockey). 
Other finalists: Ian Robertson (rugby), Jack du Preez (cricket), Steve Sherren (squash), Nicky Price (golf).

1975 at BULAWAYO
Winners: George Harvey, Dennis Watson (golf). 
Other finalists: Lucie Springett (bowls), Brian Davison (cricket), Peter Morgenrood and Denis Lapham (yachting).
Visit: http://rhodesiansportprofiles.blogspot.com/2012/11/denis-watson-and-george-harvey.html 

1976 at SALISBURY
Winner: Ian Robertson (rugby).
Other finalists: Colin Dowdeswell (tennis ), Jack Heron (cricket), George Shaya (soccer), Flo Kennedy (bowls).
Visit: http://rhodesiansportprofiles.blogspot.com/2012/10/ian-william-robertson.html 

1977 at SALISBURY
Winner: David Westerhout (pistol shooting). 
Other finalists: Liz Chase (hockey), Gerald Peckover (hockey), Alan Sutherland (rugby), Teddy Webber (golf).
Visit: http://rhodesiansportprofiles.blogspot.com/2012/11/david-ian-westerhout.html 

1978 at SALISBURY
Winner: Teddy Webber (golf). 
Other finalists: Ian Robertson (rugby), Langton "Schoolboy" Tinago (boxing), Don Hollingworth (shooting), Stuart Robertson (cricket).
Visit: http://rhodesiansportprofiles.blogspot.com/2012/11/edward-arthur-webber.html 

1979 at SALISBURY
Winner: Simon Hobday (golf). 
Other finalists: Kenias Tembo (athletics), Trevor Wilkinson (squash), Shacky Tauro (soccer), John Musa (cycling).
Visit: http://rhodesiansportprofiles.blogspot.com/2012/11/simon-hobday.html 

Zimbabwe
1980 at BULAWAYOFinalists: Ann Grant (hockey),Sunday Marimo (soccer), Langton "Schoolboy" Tinago (boxing), Antonette Wilken (diving), Trevor Wilkinson (squash).

"At the time of going to press, the winner had not been announced."

1976 - (Top left to right)
Colin Dowdeswell - Jack Heron
(Bottom left to right)
Flo Kennedy - George Shaya - Ian Robertson

1977 (Top left to right)
Alan Sutherland - Liz Chase - Dave Westerhout
(Bottom left to right)
Teddy Webber - Gerald Peckover

1978 (Top left to right)
Ian Robertson - Don Hollingworth
(Bottom left to right)
Teddy Webber - Langton "Schoolboy" Tinago - Stuart Robertson


1979 (Top left to right)
Kenias Tembo - Trevor Wilkinson - Shacky Tauro
(Bottom left to right)
Simon Hobday - John Musa
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Wednesday, 14 November 2012

Moscow Olympic Games 1980

 Moscow Olympic Games 1980
 Zimbabwe Women's Hockey Team


Back: Helen Volk - Pat McKillop - Elisabeth Chase
Middle: Christine Prinsloo - Sandra Chick -Linda Watson
Front: Susan Huggett - Ann Grant - Sarah English



Back: Arlene Boxhall - Gilian Cowley
Middle: Anthea Stewart - Sonia Robertson
Front: Patricia Davies - Brenda Phillips - Maureen George

Sarah English, Ann Grant (Capt), Brenda Phillips, Patricia McKillop, Sonia Robertson, Patricia Davies, Maureen George, Linda Watson, Susan Huggett, Gillian Cowley, Elisabeth Chase (Vice-capt.), Sandra Chick, Helen Volk, Christine Prinsloo, Arlene Boxhall, Anthea Stewart (Player-coach).

Officials: Miss Elizabeth Dreyer, Manageress and President of Zimbabwe Women's Hockey Association.

Secretary: Miss Audrey Palmer.

Triumph of the Zimbabwe Women's Hockey
Team as telexed from Moscow by Glen Byrom

2018:PROZIMHERALD EXBYROM:
MOSCOW, THURSDAY
FROM GLEN BYROM
GOLDGIRIS ONE...


THE CHAMPAGNE CORKS POPPED MERRILY AT THE DYNAMO STADIUM RESTAURANT THIS EVENING AS ZIMBABWE'S OVERJOYED 'GOLDEN GIRLS' OF HOCKEY CELEBRATED THEIR CROWNING AS OLYMPIC CHAMPIONS.

MOMENTS BEFORE THEY HAD PROUDLY STEPPED UP TO THE RED-CARPETED WINNERS' ROSTRUM ONE BY ONE TO RECEIVE THEIR GOLD MEDALS FROM MR. REG ALEXANDER, A KENYAN MEMBER OF THE INTERNATIONAL OLYMPIC COMMITTEE, WHO WAS ACCOMPANIED BY BELGIUM'S MR. RENEE FRANK, THE PRESIDENT OF THE INTERNATIONAL HOCKEY FEDERATION.

TO THUNDEROUS APPLAUSE, IT WAS THE TEAM CAPTAIN, 25-YEAR-OLD SALISBURY BOOKKEEPER ANN GRANT, WHO STEPPED ON TO THE ROSTRUM TO RECEIVE THE FIRST GOLD MEDAL FOR WOMEN'S HOCKEY IN OLYMPICS HISTORY.

ONCE ALL 16 GIRLS HAD THE BEAUTIFUL GOLD MEDALS HANGING AROUND THEIR NECKS, THEY WAVED HAPPILY TO A SMALL BUT VOCIFEROUS BUNCH OF ZIMBABWE SUPPORTERS IN THE STANDS.

DRESSED IN THEIR BLUE SKIRTS AND BRIGHT BLUE ZIMBABWE OLYMPIC BLAZERS, THEY HAD MARCHED ON TO THE FIELD - WHERE HOURS EARLIER THEY HAD BEATEN AUSTRIA 4-1, TO WIN THE GOLD - TO THE FANFARE OF TRUMPETS FROM A LARGE SOVIET MILITARY BAND. THE EMOTION-CHARGED CEREMONY WAS BEAMED TO MILLIONS OF TELEVISION VIEWERS THROUGHOUT THE WORLD BY SATELLITE. AND SO, ON THIS MOMENTOUS DAY IN THE HISTORY OF ZIMBABWE SPORT, THE COUNTRY WAS FIRMLY PLACED ON THE WORLD SPORTING MAP.

2030 i PROZIMHERALD EXBYROM :
MOSCOW, THURSDAY

GOLDGIRLS TWO...

ONCE THE SILVER MEDALS HAD BEEN PRESENTED TO CZECHOSLOVAK IA
AND THE BRONZE MEDALS TO THE SOVIET UNION THERE WAS A POIGNANT AND UNFORGETTABLE MOMENT WHEN, TO THE STRAINS OF THE HAUNTINGLY BEAUTIFUL OLYMPIC HYMN, DEDICATED TO PEACE AND FRIENDSHIP AMONG SPORTSMEN OF THE WORLD, THE ZIMBABWE FLAG WAS HOISTED WHILE THE 8,000 PEOPLE IN THE STADIUM STOOD RIGIDLY TO ATTENTION IN
SALUTE.

THE IMPRESSIVE AND MOVING CEREMONY TOOK 40 MINUTES AND ENDED WITH THE ZIMBABWE TEAM LEADING THE OTHER MEDAL-WINNING NATIONS IN A WALKING LAP OF HONOUR.

THEY RECEIVED A TUMULTUOUS RECEPTION AND, TEARS STREAMING FROM MANY EYES, ALL RETURNED THE WAVES OF THE CROWD.

THE TENSION SOON SNAPPED IN THE HOCKEY RESTAURANT, WHERE MR. FRANK LINCOLN, THE PRESIDENT OF THE ZIMBABWE OLYMPIC COMMITTEE, PRESENTED ROSES TO EACH OF THE PLAYERS AND OFFICIALS AND TOASTED THE TEAM WITH SOVIET CHAMPAGNE.

IT WAS A SCENE OF PURE DELIGHT AS THE GIRLS CHATTED EXCITEDLY, SANG LOUDLY AND EVEN STRUCK UP SOME IMPROMPTU DANCING. THEY SIGNED AUTOGRAPHS, SWAPPED BADGES AND OH-SO-PROUDLY WORE THEIR GOLD MEDALS.

THE COMPLIMENTS FLEW THICK AND FAST FROM REPRESENTATIVES OF THE F.I.H. AND FROM MANY OF THE NATIONS. THE RUSSIAN COACH, A MAN, DISHED OUT SOVIET HOCKEY BADGES AND WAS GIVEN A ZIMBABWE HOCKEY TIE IN RETURN.

2041:PROZIMHE RALD EXBYROM:
MOSCOW, THURSDAY
SOLDGIRLS THREE...


PROPOSING A TOAST TO ZIMBABWE, AND SPEAKING THROUGH AN INTERPRETER HE SAID: "WE ARE GLAD FOR YOU AND FOR YOUR COUNTRY THAT YOU HAVE WON THE HONOURED OLYMPIC GOLD. WE LIKE YOU AS PEOPLE AND WE LIKE YOU AS SPORTSMEN. WE THANK YOU FOR YOUR FRIENDSHIP AND WE ARE VERY HAPPY YOU HAVE MET OUR HOCKEY GIRLS ON THE FIELD."

ANN GRANT RESPONDED TO THE TOAST AND THE ZIMBABWEANS GAVE THE SOVIETS A ROUSING THREE CHEERS.

ZIMBABWE ENDED THE TOURNAMENT AS THE ONLY UNBEATEN TEAM, GAINING EIGHT POINTS FROM THREE WINS AND TWO DRAWS.

AND BLUE WAS THEIR LUCKY COLOUR. COACH ANTHEA STEWART CONFIDED IN ME BEFORE THE GAME: "WHEN WE'VE WORN OUR BLUE OUTFITS WE'VE WON BOTH GAMES, BUT WHEN WE WORE OUR GREEN ONLY DREW. WE'RE WEARING BLUE TODAY AND JU-ST HOPE OUR LUCKY TREND CONTINUES."

IT DID AND ZIMBABWE, PLAYING SUPERBLY CONFIDENT AND SKILFUL HOCKEY IN THE SECOND HALF, FINISHED WITH A 4-1 WIN AGAINST AUSTRIA THAT PUT THEM A POINT CLEAR OF CZECHOSLOVAK IA AND TWO POINTS AHEAD OF THE RUSSIANS, WHO BEAT INDIA 3-1 IN THE
 FINAL GAME.

ZIMBABWE'S 13 GOALS IN THE FIVE GAMES WERE TWO MORE THAN NEXT BEST, RUSSIA, WHILE THEY CONCEDED FEWER GOALS (FOUR) THAN ANY TEAM - A TRIBUTE TO THE OUTSTANDING DEFENDERS ANN GRANT AND MAUREEN GEORGE AND SOME FINE SAVES UNDER PRESSURE- BY GOALKEEPER SARAH ENGLISH.

2114 : PROZIMHERALD EXBYROM s
MOSCOW, THURSDAY
GOLDGIRLS FOUR


IN ATTACK, DIMINUTIVE PAT MCKILLOP OF BULAWAYO STOLE THE OLYMPIC SHOW WITH SIX GOALS, JOINT TOP FOR THE TOURNAMENT WITH THE SOVIET UNION'S NATELLA KARASNIKOVA.

THE 23-YEAR-OLD MRS. MCKILLOP, A FORMER EVELINE SCHOOLGIRL, WHO IS SISTER OF NATIONAL MEN'S PLAYER DEREK FRASER, GAINED THE DISTINCTION IN MOSCOW OF SCORING THE FIRST GOAL IN OLYMPICHISTORY FOR WOMEN'S HOCKEY WHILE TODAY SHE COOLLY SLAMMED IN A SHORT CORNER THAT PUT ZIMBABWE 2-1 UP AND CLINCHED THE GOLD MEDAL.

ELIZABETH CHASE, DESPITE THE HANDICAP OF A BADLY INJURED KNEE THAT CUT HER EFFECTIVENESS MARKEDLY, SCORED THREE GOALS FOR A JOINT FIFTH RANKING AT THE GAMES ALONG WITH CZECH JIRINA CERMAKOVA.

1601:PROZIMHERALD EXBYROM:
MOSCOW, THURSDAY
GLEN BYROM
ZIMGOLD ONE...


ZIMBABWE HAVE STRUCK GOLD IN MOSCOW, THAT WAS THE SENSATIONAL NEWS FLASHED TO MILLIONS OF PEOPLE THROUGHOUT THE WORLD TODAY AFTER ZIMBABWE BEAT AUSTRIA 4-1 TO WIN THE FIRST-EVER OLYMPIC WOMEN'S HOCKEY TOURNAMENT.

AFTER A TENSE AND EVEN FIRST HALF, WHEN THE SCORES WERE LOCKED AT 1-1, ZIMBABWE'S PLAY FLOURISHED IN THE SECOND HALF AT THE DYNAMO STADIUM AS ANN GRANT'S ELATED TEAM SIMPLY OVERWHELMED THE AUSTRIANS.

THERE WERE INCREDIBLE SCENES OF UNRESTRAINED JOY AS THE ZIMBABWEANS, TEARS STREAMING FROM THEIR EYES, DANCED ABOUT THE FIELD HUGGING AND KISSING EACH OTHER.

ZIMBABWE TEAM OFFICIALS, MARK MANOLIOS AND ERIC BARBOUR HAD SIX BOTTLES OF RUSSIAN CHAMPAGNE ON HAND AND THEY WERE CRACKED OPEN ON THE FIELD AS THE PLAYERS CELEBRATED THIS GLORIOUS MOMENT FOR ZIMBABWE.

IT WAS A HISTORY-MAKING EFFORT IN MANY WAYS, THIS WAS ZIMBABWE'S FIRST EVER OLYMPIC MEDAL OF ANY DESCRIPTION - PREVIOUSLY THE COUNTRY TOOK PART IN THE OLYMPIADS OF ROME (1960) AND TOKYO (1964) AS RHODESIA, WHEN THE MOST NOTABLE ACHIEVEMENT WAS THE LATE DAVID BUTLER'S FOURTH PLACE IN THE FLYING DUTCHMAN YACHTING CLASS
 IN 1960.

BUT IT IS AS AFRICA'S NEWEST INDEPENDENT NATION THAT ZIMBABWE HAVE TODAY BEC0ME OLYMPIC GOLD MEDALLISTS. IT IS NO EXAGGERATION TO SAY THAT THE PLAYERS HAVE IMMORTALISED THEMSELVES, FOR THIS WAS THE FIRST WOMEN'S HOCKEY TOURNAMENT IN THE HISTORY OF THE OLYMPIC GAMES AND THEY ARE THE FIRST CHAMPIONS.

1600 : PROZIMHERALD EXBYROM
MOSCOW, THURSDAY
FROM GLEN BYROM
ZIMGOLD TWO...


ZIMBABWE HAD ALREADY HAD THE HONOUR OF PLAYING THE VERY FIRST OLYMPIC MATCH, WHICH THEY WON 4-0 AGAINST POLAND. AND IT WAS BULAWAYO'S PAT MCKILLOP WHO ETCHED HER NAME IN HISTORY BY SCORING THE FIRST OLYMPIC GOAL.

WHEN THE HOOTER SOUNDED FOR FULL TIME AND THE GOLD WAS THEIRS, THE ZIMBABWEANS INSTINCTIVELY HOISTED THEIR CAPTAIN ANN GRANT SHOULDER-HIGH AND CARRIED HER OFF THE FIELD.

THEY SANG AS THEY SWIGGED CHAMPAGNE AND WHEN A BBC TELEVISION CREW INTERVIEWED THEM FIVE MINUTES AFTER THEIR TRIUMPH, THEY JOYFULLY SHOUTED "ZIMBABWE" AS THEY FLAPPED THEIR ARMS ROOSTER- STYLE - A SALUTE TO PRIME MINISTER MR. ROBERT MUGABE, WHO NOT ONLY BACKED ZIMBABWE'S PARTICIPATION IN THESE MOSCOW GAMES BUT PERSONALLY TOLD THE TEAM AT AN EVE-OF-DEPARTURE COCKTAIL PARTY: "I FEEL SURE YOU WILL BRING BACK A GOLD MEDAL FOR ZIMBABWE."

IT IS ONLY THE SECOND GOLD MEDAL WON BY SPORTSMEN FROM THE AFRICAN CONTINENT HERE, FOLLOWING ETHIOPIA'S MIRUTS YIFTER'S SUCCESS IN THE 10 000 METRES, AND THE ZIMBABWEANS WILL HAVE 16 GOLD MEDALS TO TAKE HOME - ONE FOR EVERY REGISTERED PLAYER, AND THAT INCLUDES COACH ANTHEA STEWART, WHO PLAYED HALF THE MATCH AGAINST INDIA ON WEDNESDAY. THE ONLY PLAYER WHO DID NOT GET ON TO THE FIELD WAS RESERVE GOALKEEPER ARLENE BOXHALL, BUT SHE WILL ALSO SHARE IN THIS TRIUMPH AND TAKE HOME A GOLD MEDAL.

2115: PROZIMHERALD EXBYROM:
MOSCOW, THURSDAY
FROM GLEN BYROM
MOSCWIN ONE...


THE 'GOLDEN' GOAL CAME EXACTLY 15 MINUTES INTO THE SECOND HALF. THAT WAS THE MOMENT, ON A GLORIOUS SUMMER'S MORNING IN MOSCOW, THAT BULAWAYO'S PATRICIA MCKILLOP STROKED A SHORT CORNER WITH POWER AND PRECISION TO DEFLECT OFF AN OPPONENT'S STICK AND FLY HIGH INTO THE NET TO GIVE ZIMBABWE A 2-1 LEAD OVER AUSTRIA.

IT WAS ALSO THE MOMENT TO PUT NEW FIRE AND LIFE INTO THE ZIMBABWE GIRLS AND THEREAFTER THEY SIMPLY OVERRAN AUSTRIA WITH A SPLENDID DISPLAY OF FAST, ATTACKING HOCKEY TO FINALLY WIN 4-1 AND BECOME THE FIRST GOLD MEDAL WINNERS FOR WOMEN'S HOCKEY.

URGED ON BY FREQUENT SHOUTS OF "PAMBERE ZIMBABWE" FROM A SMALL BUT ENTHUSIASTIC BAND OF FELLOW OLYMPIANS, THE ZIMBABWEANS GREW IN STATURE AND TOOK COMMAND TO SUCH A DEGREE THAT THEY FORCED EIGHT SHORT CORNERS AND FOUR LONG CORNERS IN THE SECOND HALF TO THE SINGLE LONG CORNER BY AUSTRIA.

THIS SUPREMACY FOLLOWED A TENSE AND EVENLY BALANCED FIRST HALF WHEN THE KEYED-UP ZIMBABWE PLAYERS SUFFERED BADLY FROM NERVES.

AUSTRIA'S FRIEDERIKE STERN WAS CLEAR IN THE CIRCLE AFTER 15 MINUTES, BUT SHOT JUST WIDE, WHILE ZIMBABWE WERE AWARDED FIVE SHORT CORNERS AND COULD NOT CONTROL ANY.

2123: PROZIMHERALD EXBYROM:
 MO&OW, THURSDAY
 MOSCWIN TWO....


THEN, AFTER 28 MINUTES, THE DEADLOCK WAS BROKEN WHEN LEFT-WING SANDY CHICK STOPPED A LONG CORNER, HIT CLEANLY, AND CONTROLLED HER SHOT BEAUTIFULLY TO GIVE ZIMBABWE A 1-0 LEAD.

BUT THIS LIVED FOR ONLY TWO MINUTES. ANDREA PORSCH PUT IN A SPIRITED RUN, HER SHOT BEING WELL SAVED BY ENGLISH. BUT THE GOALKEEPER DID NOT CLEAR HARD ENOUGH AND IN THE SCRAMBLE FOR THE BALL A FEW METRES FROM THE GOAL AUSTRIA WERE AWARDED A PENALTY STROKE. BRIGITTEKINDLER FLICKED IT HIGH INTO THE LEFT CORNER OF THE NET AND IT WAS 1-1 TO HAVE THE AUSTRIANS IN THE CROWD SINGING HAPPILY.

CHRISTINE PRINSLOO SUBSTITUTED FOR BRENDA PHILLIPS IN THE SECOND PERIOD AS ZIMBABWE IMMEDIATELY TOOK COMMAND TO KEEP THE AUSTRIAN GOAL UNDER SIEGE, ESPECIALLY TOWARDS THE END, WITH THE GOLD MEDAL SAFE, WITH ZIMBABWE ABANDONING THEIR DEFENSIVE THREE-FORWARDS AND PUSHING UP A FRONT FIVE, THE BALL BEGAN TO FLOW AND THERE WERE SEVERAL DELIGHTFUL INTER-PASSING MOVEMENTS THAT SHOWED THESE GIRLS HAVE THE SKILLS.

MCKILLOP'S GOAL PROVIDED THE SPARK FOR THIS CHANGE OF TACTICS AND IT WAS GILL COWLEY WHO MADE IT 3-1 AFTER 25 MINUTES. FROM A FREE HIT JUST OUTSIDE THE CIRCLE, CHICK'S ACUTE ANGLED SHOT WAS BLOCKED 3UT COWLEY WAS FOLLOWING UP WELL TO SCORE.

THE GOLD MEDAL WAS NOW IN THEIR HANDS AND THE ZIMBABWEANS JUST GOT BETTER AND BETTER, THEIR SPIRITS LIFTED AND NO THOUGHT WAS GIVEN TO THEIR TIREDNESS.

2127: PROZIMHERALD EXBYROM:
MOSCOW, THURSDAY
MOSCWIN THREE LAST.


IT WAS A MAGNIFICENT THROUGH PASS BY LIZ CHASE THAT SENT PAT MCKILLOP SCUTTLING OFF TO COMPLETE HER OLYMPIC GLORY BY CRUNCHING IN ONE OF THE BEST FIELD GOALS OF THE TOURNAMENT, JUST SIX MINUTES FROM THE HOOTER.

THE GOLD ASSURED, THE SMALL SECTION OF ZIMBABWE SUPPORTERS- BURST FORTH WITH A TYPICALLY AFRICAN SONG "ZULU WARRIOR" TO USHER IN MEMORABLE TRIUMPH FOR THE CONTINENT'S NEWEST- AND TONIGHT, PROUDEST NATION.

End


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Edward Arthur Webber


If THERE is one thing diminutive Teddy Webber knows as much about as playing golf, it's how to keep a cool head, even when the chips are well and truly down. Always a good golfer, it was this ice-cool temperament which made this young man from Umtali a great sportsman.

A leading Rhodesian amateur for many years, Webber's first major achievement was winning the South African amateur match play title in 1977. That firmly established him as a 'name' in Southern Africa. He was the first Rhodesian to win the title and it capped a great year on the local circuit in which Webber won the Rhodesian amateur by a massive eleven strokes, the Mashonaland, Manicaland and Midlands championships and the Follow-the-Sun tournament at Triangle.

Looking at those achievements, few would have thought that the quietly spoken, unassuming Webber would go one better in 1978, his truly golden year in which he was to keep his head when all about him were losing theirs.

It was a historic occasion on 11 March when Webber disposed of Etienne Groenewald three and two on the tricky beach-front course at Durban Country Club to carry off the South African amateur match play title for the second time. The little Rhodesian was the first man in the 54-year history of the South African amateur championship to win the title twice.

Victory was not easy for Webber and if he had not taken heed of Rudyard Kipling's advice and met triumph and disaster, treating "those two impostors just the same", things could easily have gone wrong for him. But temperament and determination to stay unruffled, won the day.

The final against Groenewald was Webber's fifth match in three days after seventy-two holes of stroke play — a gruelling test of golf stamina. His calmness helped him to overcome two bad patches.

He was four up when he stepped on to the first tee to start the last eighteen holes of the final. He hit his first bad drive and got into trouble in the rough. After going out of bounds, Webber was forced to concede the hole.

But he did not let it upset him. Again he was able to keep his cool when he gave Groenewald a chance by chipping poorly and then three-putting on the fifth when he should have had the hole sewn up. Webber then tightened up his game and by the sixteenth the match was over.

"I was speechless, but it was a great feeling," Webber said afterwards. "It wasn't like last year. This time I had lots of Rhodesians giving me support and it helped plenty."

South Africa's most widely travelled golf personality, George Blumberg, who is better known as 'Uncle George', watched Webber win the title at Durban. "Webber is the most professional amateur in the business as far as playing the game of golf is concerned," Mr. Blumberg said. It was a remarkable achievement especially as Webber had completed an Army call-up only two weeks previously and was not particularly well-prepared for the championships.

Edward Arthur 'Teddy' Webber was born on 28 August 1951 at Umtali where he was educated and lived until 1979 when he moved to Salisbury. He started playing golf when he was six but did not take it seriously until he played in his first competition when he was twelve.

His first official handicap was thirty-two and playing off this at Umtali Golf Club he once scored fifty-two stableford points and was then cut to twenty-three. Within a year he was down to thirteen and a year later he was a six, then a three. He then joined the Hillside Golf Club and within six months was down to scratch. As a leading amateur his handicap fluctuated between plus two and plus three.

Webber continued to flourish, and he won the Rhodesian junior championship in 1968 after picking up the Mashonaland title the year before. In 1974 he was runner- up to Mark McNulty in the Rhodesian senior championship and in that year first represented Rhodesia in the Eisenhower Trophy in the Dominican Republic where the team finished thirteenth. In 1976 he again represented his country in the international Eisenhower Trophy at Penina Golf Club in Portugal.

The young Webber did as well at Penina, turning in the best four-round score for Rhodesia, which earned him fifth place in the world individual placings. There was no stopping the curly-haired Umtali golfer after that, and in 1977 he won the Rhodesian championship, the Manicaland and Mashonaland titles, the Hillside Masters for the third year in succession, and then crowned a great season by pocketing his first South African title in beating Richter van Niekerk on the thirty seventh hole at Bryanston Country Club.

People often talk of Simon Hobday, George Harvey, Nicky Price and Mark McNulty but few Rhodesian amateur golfers have been able to compare favourably with Webber's record.

November 1978 crowned a great season for Webber. He was elected Rhodesian Sportsman of the Year for some great achievements, the best of which was winning the South African title for the second year in succession. Webber was also a finalist for this top Rhodesian sporting award in 1977, when he was elected Golfer of the Year.

Webber was always the epitome of true sportsmanship on and off the course and was held in the highest regard by players and officials alike. After Webber won his second South African title, the Rhodesia Golf Union president, Doug Pechey, was at Salisbury airport to welcome Teddy home. "We are thrilled and proud of Teddy's achievements. There are not enough adjectives in the book," Mr. Pechey said.

In the latter part of 1978, Webber made the big decision to turn professional and he finished nineteenth in the South African Professional Golf Association's order of merit in his first crack at the Sunshine Circuit.

He would most certainly have finished higher had he been allowed to compete in the final event, the Holiday Inns in Swaziland, but he was refused a visa on his Rhodesian passport. At the time he had been in good form and was lying fourteenth.

In March 1979, Webber accepted the post of professional at Royal Salisbury Golf Club where members were happy to gain the full benefit of his expertise.

— McDERMOTT.

End

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David Ian Westerhout


 DAVE WESTERHOUT has long been noted as a perfectionist. As an academic at university he was twice awarded marks of 100 per cent for examination papers on the physiology of vision. And as a sportsman he has always possessed the temperament and quality of a champion, representing Britain in the 1958 Commonwealth Games as a 440 yards hurdler.

 It was thus not surprising that a man of such calibre should ultimately distinguish himself as a world champion. But it was remarkable that Dave Westerhout should gain acclaim as world champion for sanctions-hit Rhodesia in combat pistol shooting — a sport in which shooters in this country did not have the weaponry, ammunition nor experience to consider themselves the equal of major nations like America and West Germany.

 However, the threat posed by Rhodesia's small band of dedicated combat pistol men to the cream of the world's marksmen was evident from the inaugural world championships at Zurich, Switzerland, in 1975. Rhodesia finished third in the team event, with Lionel Smith third in the individual championship, and Westerhout, a relative newcomer to the sport, a creditable eleventh.

 The 1976 world championships were staged at Salzburg, Austria, where Smith was again third, with Westerhout improving to fourth place. But the team event was won by Rhodesia, who beat Norway by a mere 29 points in an exhilarating competition, with the 'big guns' of America trailing in third place, 185 points behind.

 The Americans had been practising this type of shooting for twenty years and up to that time had been undisputed kings. Thus it was incredible that a small nation like Rhodesia should outpoint them and take over as world leaders. The Rhodesians who became the world champion team were, Westerhout (captain), Lionel Smith, Peter Maunder, Alex du Plessis and Dave Arnold, all from Salisbury.

 This set the scene for an intriguing 1977 world championship at the Cleveland Range at Salisbury, with the sharp-shooting Americans determined to regain their pride and exact revenge for their Salzburg defeat.

 Westerhout was Rhodesian captain for the third successive year. He could take the major credit for persuading the shooting nations of the world to stage the championships in strife-torn Rhodesia — still in the throes of a bush war.

 The charismatic Westerhout paying his own way, represented Rhodesia at the meeting of the International Practical Shooting Confederation in America where it was unanimously agreed to stage the event at Salisbury in August 1977, after he had lobbied extensively for a week. That decision in itself was a notable triumph for Rhodesia and for Westerhout.

 Feverish work at Cleveland over many months prepared the range to international standard, commerce and industry readily coming to the aid of the enterprising pistol men.

 The indefatigable Westerhout was not content to sit back and shoot He took full charge as chairman of the organising committee, a position entailing a heavy workload which inevitably cut deeply into his preparation time for the actual competition.

 Teams arrived from Rhodesia, America, Australia, South Africa, West Germany, Norway, Belgium, Britain and Switzerland. The Americans included the redoubtable Ray Chapman, world champion in 1975 and runner-up in 1976 to Norwegian Jan Foss.

 But it was the supremely fit and athletic Dave Westerhout who took the lead from the outset and became world champion in grand style — finishing 116 points ahead of runner-up Peter Maunder, another Rhodesian, and 158 clear of the third-placed Raoul Walters of America. Thus these world championships really belonged to Westerhout in many ways, climaxed by him gaining the tag 'world champion'. He had the top score of all eighty-six competitors in four of the varied shoots and was always among the leaders.

 For the second successive year, the Rhodesians won the team championship, this time with Westerhout Lionel Smith, Alex du Plessis, Andy Langley and Peter Boniface. The team was chosen after a series of intensive trials, but twelve others were selected to participate as individuals. One of these was Peter Maunder, who was ranked only fifteenth in Rhodesia at the start of the championships but proved to have been underrated by outshooting all but Westerhout

 There were never many points separating Rhodesia and America in the fight for the team championship and the lead was traded throughout The results had finally to be calculated by computer and it was not until some time after the shooting was over that Rhodesia were declared the winners.

 It was Westerhout's class under white-hot pressure that pulled Rhodesia to the front and edged out the Americans. After the 'jungle lane' shoot, Rhodesia had closed the gap on the leading Americans, but they moved ahead with sensational shooting in the 'house clearing' and 'vehicle' shoots.

 In the 'house clearing', Rhodesia were trying to match an excellent shoot by the Americans and were under further pressure after a penalty of ten points imposed for an accidental discharge.

 It was left to the last two shooters, Smith and Westerhout, to keep Rhodesia in touch. A tense home crowd of about 200 watched Smith score a possible 250 with the best time of the shoot (50,4 sec.). It was a difficult challenge for Westerhout, but he was equal to it and also scored a maximum 250, but clipped 2,3 seconds from Smith's time.

 Rhodesia were now just a fraction behind in the team race, but were to surge ahead on the 'vehicle shoot, where Westerhout s time was half that of many other competitors, though he still managed a score of 216 out of 220 to give him by far the best hit factor and total.

 For his achievement, Westerhout was honoured as the Rhodesian Sportsman of the Year for 1977 and was awarded the John Hopley Memorial Trophy. It was a fitting tribute to a remarkable personality.

 David Ian Westerhout was born in England on 20 May 1936 and educated at Bancroft's School, Essex and London University. After qualifying as an optician he practised for a year in Britain before emigrating to Rhodesia in 1959, where he began to specialise in contact lens fitting. By the late 1970s he had an international reputation in this field and was being invited to undertake lecture tours of America, England, Germany, South Africa and New Zealand.

 He married a Rhodesian girl, Isobelle Whittle-Herbert, in 1964. They returned to England in 1967, where Westerhout was elected president of the Contact Lens Society in 1970. The Westerhouts returned to Rhodesia in 1971. He shared with Dr. John Hanks the 1974 Zimbabwe Award which honours outstanding young people in this country.

 He played first-league rugby and cricket at Salisbury and in 1960 and 1961 was selected to represent Rhodesia on the track, where he set a national record for the 220 yards hurdles and was awarded his colours. He is interested in game and veld conservation and is an honorary game officer of the Department of National Parks and Wild Life Management.

 But it was as a combat pistol marksman that he brought to Rhodesia a rare world individual championship, and spearheaded the team's victory at two successive championships. These were achieved despite the severe handicap of using inferior weapons. At the 1976 championships in Austria, for instance, Westerhout, Maunder and Arnold were forced to share one pistol. They started with two, but the night before the championship, the sight broke off one weapon and all three had to share the other.

 In international practical pistol shooting, the Americans, with plenty of money and unrestricted ammunition and practice, reckon on two guns to a man. To share would be anathema to them. Because of serious shortages of modern guns and ammunition, the Rhodesians cast their own bullet heads and used recharged cartridge cases. Clearly, under such handicaps, they could not waste precious ammunition on the endless hours of practice which are normally necessary to be able to compete at world championship level.

 In early 1980 Westerhout switched styles to Olympic rapid fire pistol and in just six months won a place in Zimbabwe's hastily assembled Olympic team for Moscow. But the two styles are about as different as squash from tennis, and he did not have the experience to be competitive at Moscow. His new Hammerli pistol broke on arrival and he could not practise for a week. This demolished his confidence to the extent that he finished 38th out of 40 with a score of 529. A second Zimbabwean, Bulawayo's Ian Redmond, was joint 33rd with 576. The winner, Ion Corneliu of Romania shot 596, but like all the eastern bloc competitors was ultra-professional in terms of time and ammunition expended in practice.

 In the Olympic free pistol, Salisbury's Maureen Reichert was the only woman among a field of 33. She finished 28th on 524, with Redmond 27th on 527. Winner was the Soviet Union's Aleksandr Melentev with a new world record of 581.

 Another Zimbabwe competitor was Salisbury's Dennis Hardman, who in the prone rifle was joint 25th out of 56 with a score of 592 — a highly satisfactory result.

 Hungary's Karoly Varga won the Gold Medal by equalling the world record of 599. In three positional rifle, Hardman suffered badly from nerves and lapsed to 30th out of 39 shooters with a tally of 1117. Russia's Viktor Vlasov was the winner with the world record of 1173.

 WORLD CHAMPIONSHIPS
 
Salzburg, Austria 1976: Team placings— 1, Rhodesia (1 763 pts.);2, Norway (1 734); 3, America (1 578); 4, South Africa (1 566); 5, West Germany (1562); 6, Austria (1 533). Individual placings — 1, J. Foss (Norway); 2, R. Chapman (U.S.); 3, L. Smith (Rhodesia); 4, Westerhout (Rhodesia). Other Rhodesians: P. Maunder (8), D. Arnold (11), A. du Plessis (29).

 — BYROM.

 End

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Robert Andrew Stewart

 When the BIG. bearded lock forward Rob Stewart left Rhodesia in the first few days of 1980 to settle in South Africa he had the distinction of being the country's most capped rugby player.

 After nine seasons with the national side the thirty-year-old Stewart had appeared 72 times in the green and white jersey in a career stretching from his debut in 1970 to the final game of 1979, when Rhodesia beat Griqualand West at Bulawayo to retain their place in the A Section of Currie Cup. He had only missed the 1974 season when he went into brief retirement

 His 72 appearances up to the end of 1979 put him ahead of such illustrious names as Iain Buchanan (65), Des van Jaarsveldt (62), Dick Coleshaw (62), Brian Murphy (56) and Ian Robertson (56), the only players up to that time to have reached the 50 mark.

 But more than holding the honour of the 'most capped player' Stewart distinguished himself with a record which is unlikely to be broken for many years — from the May 1975 match against Free State, when he displaced Mike Jakobi, he played for Rhodesia in an unbroken sequence of 56 games.

 As he left to play in the Transvaal (he joined Wits University) Stewart said: "I am very sorry to be leaving Rhodesia. I have enjoyed my rugby here with a tremendous bunch of guys. The biggest thing Rhodesians have is guts and determination, and all sides down south are scared of them."

 His major regret was that club rugby had been seriously disrupted for many years through the security situation — call-ups of young men were incessant during the bush war. In 1979 his Midlands club, Sabi Stars, had five Rhodesian players, yet they seldom practised together and could never hope to play to their full potential.

 His most memorable matches for Rhodesia?

 "When we honoured 'Choppy' (LeRoy Duberly) by beating Natal at the end of 1979... in 1973 when I scored a try from our own 22m line at Durban and we won . . . and when we beat Western Province at Salisbury in 1977."

 That Western Province match was one of Rhodesia's most famous rugby victories.

 Stewart's major disappointment was losing to Northern Transvaal in the 1973 Currie Cup semifinals at Loftus Versfeld — the closest the country has ever come to reaching the coveted final. Stewart recalled: "The ref beat us. I scored a try and it was disallowed. I was told I'd knocked on... I couldn't believe it. We all felt on the field that day that we could beat them."

 Rhodesia led 3-0 at half-time with an Ian Robertson penalty. Northerns then scored a controversial try followed by Stewart's disallowed 'try' that knocked some of the heart out of the team. Gradually the terrier-like Rhodesians were worn down and Northerns reached the final with a 20-7 victory.

 Robert Andrew Stewart was born at Glasgow, Scotland, on 25 September 1949 but moved to South Africa with his parents at the age of three. At Welkom High School he had to play soccer — there had been trouble between English and Afrikaner boys on the field and the school had been suspended from playing rugby for five years.

 Stewart left school in 1966 and worked for a year as a surveyor on the mines before deciding to join the British South Africa Police. "I came to Salisbury in 1967 with the intention of playing soccer," he recalled, "and I started for Police at centre-half. I was a cadet at the time and a certain officer told me it would be wise to play rugby."

 He reluctantly took this strong hint, though he continued to play soccer and was once suspended from rugby for going to soccer practices instead of rugby. "I was punished a few times and so I resigned myself to the fact that I would play rugby and give up soccer."

 However, whenever the Police team were short at soccer he enjoyed filling in and in 1969 played National League games against Dynamos, Arcadia and Chibuku. These outings put him in two minds to go back, but finally in 1970 he set his sights firmly on a rugby career.

 He had first played rugby in 1967 at full back for the Police 2nd XV, moving to the flank for the next two seasons and playing first league. He made his debut for Rhodesia as a lock against Western Transvaal at Bulawayo on 6 June 1970, Rhodesia winning this Currie Cup match 18-16. It was incredible to think that only three years before he had never been on a rugby field and now, at the age of twenty, he was playing for his country in a position at which he had only played seven times. At that time he had five Mashonaland caps — one in 1968, two in 1969 and two in 1970.

 His interest in rugby, however, waned in 1974 and he 'retired' after being capped 14 times for Rhodesia, including internationals against the All Blacks and Italy. "I have lost complete interest and have packed up for good," he said at the time. "I played in two games for Edwardians this year and found that the refereeing was so bad that it killed all my enjoyment in the game."

 But the 105 kg, 1,94 m-tall Stewart soon realised his mistake, and he returned to the game in 1975 as flank against South Eastern Transvaal at Witbank. The game was a disaster for Rhodesia, who lost 10-21, and Stewart was among several players to be axed, missing matches against Public School Wanderers and Boland before returning at lock against Free State at Bloemfontein.

 Thereafter Stewart played in every match for Rhodesia (56) up to the time of his departure. He was vice-captain on occasions; he played mostly at lock, but also as flank and eighthman. He was a Springbok trialist and played for the President's XV against the Junior Springboks in 1977.

 In his Rhodesian career he scored 68 points, including 17 tries — five of those from the lock position in the 1977 season when the All Black, Alan Sutherland, was captain and rejuvenated national rugby.

 On his departure, only four players in the history of Rhodesian rugby had scored more tries than Stewart — Eric Barrett (31), Ray Mordt (25), Danny Delport (21) and David Smith (18). He had played three internationals — All Blacks in 1970, Italy in 1973 and America in 1978. He played Rhodesia under-20 in 1968 and 1969 (captain)
 A fine ball-player one could often pick up the soccer influence in his rugby and it was a stirring sight to see the massive and highly mobile Stewart burst through, dribbling the rugby ball. He scored several fine tries in this fashion and frequently gained valuable ground for his team by this method.

 As a youngster, Stewart was talented in other sports and at the age of fifteen, swam and played water polo for the Free State. He was also an athlete and broke school records for the 220, 440, 880 and mile in one day.


 — BYROM.

End

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